Ecofeminism and family continuity during the liberation war of Turkey from internal and external enemies: westernization of Turkey after the Ottoman Empire in the current Turkish series entitled “You are my country”

Ecofeminism and family continuity during the liberation war of Turkey from internal and external enemies: westernization of Turkey after the Ottoman Empire in the current Turkish series entitled “You are my country”

Author:  Derya Agis, Ph.D. student Ankara University, Turkey

Panel: Reinventing Family Continuity after a War Hecatomb

Key words: 1920s, liberation of Turkey, Ataturk’s women as freedom fighters, ecofeminism, and womanhood and family continuity via mothers

Abstract

This study will analyze the concept of family continuity in the current Turkish series, entitled “You are my country” (“Vatanim Sensin” originally) (2016-today). The female figures and their attempts to protect their daughters, sons, sisters, and brothers will be analyzed. In the series, there is the figure of a mother called Azize who tries to protect Turkey to be established by Ataturk by hiding from her husband and daughters who know that she is dead; […]
The Turkish and Greek mothers, daughters, and sisters try to unify their families after each attack in the series. Thus, their efforts will be analyzed within the framework of “Ecofeminism” as Turkey is a land linguistically feminized in Latin as “Turquia” with a gender ending -a. The ecological metaphorical spaces associated with the images of Turkish and Greek women trying to preserve the family continuity during the liberation war will be analyzed; such ecological spaces include the Aegean Sea, forests, and roads of Izmir, Ankara, and Salonica. Moreover, ecological metaphorical objects include flowers, trees, and foods, such as fruits and vegetables. Illnesses, famines, plunders, and forced migrations are the main reasons for the losses of some family members; this study examines how these lost members get united through the metaphorical uses of the environmental spaces important for women, who try to keep the new Turkey free from radical Islamists and invader colonialists through marriages, divorces, and remarriages in the 1920s within the framework of ecofeminism, a term coined by Françoise d’Eaubonne in 1974.